Siding the House: Part 1

I say part 1, but it’s more like “years one, two, and three”. It’s been a long time in progress. And I have a long way to go, though I’m technically about 2/3 done. Potentially, all my creative energy (and time) outside of the shop and family things has funneled into this project.

It started in October 2015. Little did we know when we decided to side the house ourselves that we would, just two months later, opt to speed up our 5 year Little Woods plan to a 4 month period. We signed a lease and started the reno on our shop. So the siding took a back seat.

In 2015 we did tear off one side of the house, and found lots of dry rot and that kind of thing. After fixing it, I wrapped it up for the winter and did some reconstructive woodworking – which felt more like bondo-ing a car than woodworking.

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In 2016 our kind friends helped us get the siding on that side done.

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In 2017 I tore off another side and house wrapped it. As well as repaired the cracked window panes, glazed them, and replaced the window frames and reconstructed the window sill – dry rot. Oh and rotted studs had to be cut out and replaced. Let me just say. I never like seeing the inside of my house from the outside unless it’s through a window.

I also painted the porch and the other side of the house we sided in 2016. Doesn’t look too bad. Well except the gables. On this side it is in pretty okay shape so it has to wait until I’m ready to do all the gables… as in I need to figure out if I want replace or repair the siding and whether to keep it vertical or do shingles as an accent.

And here we are. Today I did a final coat of paint on the porch and painted the inner door blue. A couple weeks ago I replaced our storm door and just this week picked up the new storm windows we had made. Oh and last fall I glazed all the inner windows on the porch. What a huge difference that made with our heating bill!

A funny thing about the paint. When I painted the back of the house, the north side, it was flat. I’ve used flat paint before, but this was really chalky looking. Within a month it was super drab.  I tried to wash it, but a spray down with the hose was not doing it. I still had one more final coat of paint so the paint store guy recommended eggshell. Which now looks super shiny. Weird. But it washes off really easily. And I’m 2/3 done and it takes 4 coats to go from white to plum. Just sayin’. I’m way too far in to turn back to flat now.

I know it seems like a lot and over a long duration, 3 summers now, but I enjoy the work and I get a pretty big boost of satisfaction when I finish a certain section. Or reconstruct a window frame. Or paint a door. Or replace a whole stud by sawing into the side of the house. Who doesn’t feel badass after doing that for the first time and having it actually work out okay and not collapse the house.

 

Until next time….

promise there will be some craft talk 🙂

Kristin M Roach

 

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Pattern: Perfect Crochet Dishcloth

Thank you Cassandra for reminding me of this little gem of a pattern! I’m happy to add things to the website on a per-request basis. And your timing is excellent, I just found a box of peaches n’ creme in my studio clean out. Here the original post with a few edits for ease of reading. Originally published 12/14/2014.

Coming up on Christmas – just 10 days of crafting/baking left – I thought it was the perfect time to give you all some ideas for some last minute gifts. This weekend I’ve spent some time on a hand full of things like scarves, hats, and bootwarmers. But for this first last minute gift, I thought I would go with the one I’ve been making in mass for all my friends and fam: Crochet Dishcloths.

Crochet dishcloths make the perfect last minute gift. You (and I) can tuck it into a basket of baking or tie with a card for extended family, neighbors, co-workers. One evening of crocheting and you can easily have half a dozen or so. And they are useful! And by next year, they should be worn out enough that no one will mind getting more! Excellent! (In theory anyway, unless you have friends who cherish them like gold plated fine china in which case they are making a shrine to your crafting efforts and that’s okay too). Jump to the bottom of the post for the free crochet dishcloth pattern I love to make.

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For the most part, I grab my favorite stitch dictionary, select a slightly textured heavy weight pattern, and have a go at it. FYI, if considering stitch dictionaries, I highly recommend Harmony Guides: Basic Crochet Stitches.

I have often wondered what size I should crochet my dishcloth. Sure I could go measure the current ones in my kitchen, but when making them from yarn, there are other considerations. Like how wide should it be if I want to get two out of one ball of peaches n’ creme with no leftovers and have it be a square shape?

It took a few evenings of crocheting, but I finally had the answer to my query. Right drape, right size, right stitch pattern, right amount of yarn leftover (umm, zero!). I liked the drape and texture of this simple half double crochet and slip stitch “scrunch stitch” pattern. I used a size H hook (tried a G, D, and I).

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There were four sizes that came out of all this. First I started out with a foundation chain of 27 (#4), then 21 (#1), then 25 (#3), then 23 (#2). Of course the last one I tried, 23, was the magic number that allowed me to make two of the same size out of one ball of peaches ‘n’ creme yarn with no leftovers left.

Free Yarn Maximized Dishcloth Pattern


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Notes: If you want to make your own of any of the sizes I played around with, here’s the pattern for it all written up. Make a foundation chain of 23 (bolded), if you want to get two out of 1 ball of yarn.

Sizes: 1(2,3,4) = small (medium, large, x-large) 

Material: 1 ball – Peaches ‘n’ Creme Yarn – 100% Cotton Yarn. Worsted Weight. 120yds/109m. 2.5oz/70.9gm

Tools: Size H (5mm) crochet hook

Gauge:  10sc = 4 inches

Abbreviations

  • st – stitch
  • ch – chain
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sc – single crochet
  • hdc – half double crochet

Directions

Chain 21(23,25,27), turn.

Row 1: Sl st in 2nd ch from hook, *hdc in next stitch, sl st in next stitch*, repeat * * to end, turn; if done correctly, you should end with the slip stitch.

Row 2: Ch2 (counts as 1st hdc), sl st in next st (should be top of hdc in previous row),  hdc in next stitch (top of sl st in previous row, repeat * * to end, turn.

Work as row 2 until you have a square. Cut yarn and pull through last loop. Weave in all ends to finish.

Have fun crocheting up a storm!

Until next time!
Kristin